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Well ok, I don’t do it alone – Colin helps out too. After months of working in the shadows on trying to beef up The Royal’s programming, marketing and outreach efforts, it’s finally officially-official. The press release went out today via our awesome friends at Clutch PR, and I’m reprinting it here for y’all.

RoyalLOGO-Blue

The Royal announces new programmers
and five first run titles

Colin Geddes & Katarina Gligorijevic join Toronto’s historic
The Royal Cinema as programmers

it's us!

it’s us!

July 4, 2014, TORONTO – Historic movie house The Royal (608 College St.) is thrilled to announce Colin Geddes and partner Katarina Gligorijevic as its new programming directors. Veteran film industry professionals Geddes and Gligorijevic bring a diverse, fresh roster of first run premieres, special events and classic genre films to the beloved theatre.

As one of the international film programmers for TIFF for over a decade, Geddes is best known for the Midnight Madness and Vanguard selections, delivering one of a kind programming with TIFF. Gligorijevic is a Toronto based writer and producer who has worked in the music and film industry for over a decade and was Festivals Manager at REEL CANADA for eight years. The pair will bring their sharp eye for unique, captivating film to their programming at The Royal.

TheRoyal front

Along with new programming and unique special events, the pair are bringing in five first run titles exclusive to The Royal throughout the month of July. They include:

Borgman (2013)
Opening: Friday, July 4, 2014
A dark suburban fable, Borgman follows an enigmatic vagrant who enters the lives of an upper-class family and quickly unravels their carefully curated lifestyle.

Radio Free Albemuth (2010)
Opening: Friday, July 11, 2014
From sci-fi author Philip K. Dick (Blade Runner, Minority Report) comes his most prophetic thriller to date. In an alternate reality, Berkeley record store clerk Nick Brady begins to experience strange visions transmitted from an extraterrestrial source he calls VALIS. (To buy tickets click HERE)

The Dance of Reality (2013)
Opening: Friday, July 18, 2014
A full bodied and mischievous autobiography in the spirit of Federico Fellini’s Amarcord, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s return to filmmaking after 28 years explodes with great ideas. (To buy tickets click HERE)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
Opening: Friday, July 18, 2014
Tobe Hooper’s influential cult classic has been gorgeously restored for the film’s 40th anniversary. (To buy tickets click HERE)

GMO OMG (2013)
Opening: Friday, July 25, 2014
How do GMOs affect our children, the health of our planet and our freedom of choice? These questions and more are posed in this hard-hitting doc.

With a new program introduced each month, tickets priced at $10 and $8 for students/seniors, the unique setting of a vintage theatre, The Royal is unlike any other Toronto cinema.

If you’re a member of the Toronto film/arts media and you’re reading this, please send your physical mailing address to mpakulak@clutchpr.com to receive a VIP media pass.

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About The Royal
Originally built in 1939, The Royal Cinema is a historic Art Moderne movie house located in the heart of Toronto’s Little Italy. Following extensive upgrades and renovations, the 480-seat indie/art house theatre is also a digitally equipped event venue suited for live concerts, screenings, film festivals, corporate events, multimedia exhibition and more. http://www.theroyal.to

Theatre D Digital
During the daytime, Theatre D operates out of The Royal as a film and television post-production studio. The main theatre becomes a Dolby-approved 5.1 mix room and four picture editing suites are located upstairs. Esteemed Canadian directors such as Atom Egoyan (Chloe, Adoration), Deepa Mehta (Heaven on Earth), Bruce McDonald (The Husband), Sarah Polley (Stories We Tell) and Kari Skogland (Stone Angel) have mixed and/or edited their projects there. For more information visit: http://theatred.com


** Note: I’ve been behind on finishing the blog entries because I caught the mother of all Cannes Colds toward the end of the fest, but since I’m finally starting to see the light at the end of that tunnel, I figured I’d wrap up my last few days’ worth of diary entries. The rest will come tomorrow, and next week a mini roundup of my favourite films from Cannes 2014! Enjoy, and stay healthy, friends. **

Thursday May 22

This was one of those days that started out as a semi-failure (pouring rain, a failed attempt to get into the 11:30am screening of Fabrice Du Welz’s Alleluia) and then turned into a totally successful three movie bonanza!

The rain definitely put the kibosh on my desire to race around getting things done (you know, buying gifts for family, etc) so I stayed in the apartment, caught up on some emails, worked on that cursed Telefilm application (cursed only because they make it more complicated than the guidelines would have you believe. There are way more little details once you enter the actual back end of the online submission system, and many were quite time consuming. I was pretty motivated to get it the hell done though, so I was glad to be able to spend some time on it – that is, until the system kicked me out for maintenance, or something. Cursed, I swear.

a line of umbrellas trying to get into Alleluia at the Theatre Croisette

a line of umbrellas trying to get into Alleluia at the Theatre Croisette

In the evening, we managed to secure hard tickets to Alleluia, which was one of my most hotly anticipated titles and absolutely did not disappoint. It’s a Belgian take on The Honeymoon Killers and it’s both supremely weird and very fantastic. There are many friends to whom I want to heartily recommend this one.

this actress, Lola Dueñas, is crazytown amazing

this actress, Lola Dueñas, is crazytown amazing

The perfect double bill was semi-accidentally created when we also managed to land tickets to the remastered 40th anniversary screening of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Watching a gorgeous restoration film with a crowd (a very fancily dressed crowd, I might add) really drove home the point of how amazing the film actually is. It doesn’t jut “hold up” after 40 years. It actually could easily stand against any horror film of the present day in terms of good villains, incredibly creepy production design and generally effective terror. We haven’t improved a lot on that formula in the last four decades, honestly.

The film was preceded by a really moving introduction by Nicolas Winding Refn, who talked about how this was the film that inspired him to want to make movies. He also talked about how Tobe Hooper deserved to win the Palme d’Or 40 years ago. Refn was full of zingers about his own career and jokes about how soon he’d win a Palme d’Or himself. “Oscars you buy,” he said, “Palmes you earn”. He implored the audience to give him an “emotional Palme d’Or” by standing and applauding for him – which the audience did for such a long time that Hooper was visibly moved by the time he came on stage. It was actually really moving. Tears were shed.

my favourite translator, Edouard Waintrop (Quinzaine's artistic director) and Refn on stage before The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

my favourite translator, Edouard Waintrop (Quinzaine’s artistic director) and Refn on stage before The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

After the Texas Chainsaw Massacre experience, we raced over to the Palais to catch the Korean film screening at midnight, The Target. It was raining while we stood in line, and we didn’t have umbrellas, but what the hell, the weather’s been great all week so who’s complaining? The film itself was fun enough, but if it had been English language, I highly doubt we’d be talking about it right now and there’s no way in hell it’d be screening in Cannes, y’know what I mean?

The triple-bill left us dinner-less so we hoofed it up to our old neighbourhood (circa two years ago) nearer the train station to a small kiosk that sells shockingly good baked goods until very, very late at night. Walked home with some cheesy pastries and Merguez sausage rolls and avoided the Petit Majestic entirely, because sometimes you just have to eat flaky pastries and fall the hell asleep. Besides, it’s not like it was even early. The midnight films actually start at 12:30 in Cannes and are rarely on time, so by the time the 2+ hour film let out it was nigh on three o’clock.

Anyway, this is my tip for you for next year. If you need a late night snack, this place is called Au P’tit Creux d’Azur. It’s got a blue awning and is on Rue de Maréchal Foch just south of Place de la Gare (so, really, right by the train station). It’s about one block east of the big Monoprix and it’s open very, very late. Trust me on this. It is the best tip I’ve given you all month. I just wish I’d remembered earlier.

here's a screencap from Google maps

here’s a screencap from Google maps